Find Grad Schools

Study Area & Zipcode

Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher

Find Schools Near

What Do Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher Do?

Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher Definition Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance documents or details for a variety of purposes. May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies.

Life As a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher: What Do They Do?

  • Prepare reports describing any title encumbrances encountered during searching activities, and outlining actions needed to clear titles.
  • Prepare lists of all legal instruments applying to a specific piece of land and the buildings on it.
  • Direct activities of workers who search records and examine titles, assigning, scheduling, and evaluating work, and providing technical guidance as necessary.
  • Copy or summarize recorded documents, such as mortgages, trust deeds, and contracts, that affect property titles.
  • Verify accuracy and completeness of land-related documents accepted for registration, preparing rejection notices when documents are not acceptable.
  • Read search requests to ascertain types of title evidence required and to obtain descriptions of properties and names of involved parties.

What Every Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher Should Know

These are the skills Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers say are the most useful in their careers:

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Complex Problem Solving: Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Types of Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher Jobs

  • Record Searcher
  • Title Processor
  • Title Specialist
  • Transaction Coordinator
  • Title Clerk

Is There Job Demand for Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers?

There were about 69,000 jobs for Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher in 2016 (in the United States). New jobs are being produced at a rate of 4.3% which is below the national average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 3,000 new jobs for Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher by 2026. Due to new job openings and attrition, there will be an average of 6,000 job openings in this field each year.

undefined

The states with the most job growth for Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher are Utah, North Dakota, and Arizona. Watch out if you plan on working in Alaska, West Virginia, or Wisconsin. These states have the worst job growth for this type of profession.

What is the Average Salary of a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher

The average yearly salary of a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher ranges between $28,610 and $80,150.

undefined

Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers who work in District of Columbia, Oregon, or West Virginia, make the highest salaries.

How much do Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers make in different U.S. states?

State Annual Mean Salary
Alabama $43,440
Alaska $59,530
Arizona $53,850
Arkansas $37,060
California $58,180
Colorado $64,900
Connecticut $57,130
Delaware $49,160
District of Columbia $74,080
Florida $50,350
Georgia $39,410
Hawaii $58,260
Idaho $66,690
Illinois $47,670
Indiana $40,020
Iowa $35,560
Kansas $43,550
Kentucky $39,760
Louisiana $38,370
Maine $51,770
Maryland $41,100
Massachusetts $63,330
Michigan $41,350
Minnesota $58,170
Mississippi $43,500
Missouri $47,830
Montana $48,250
Nebraska $38,540
Nevada $56,090
New Hampshire $42,720
New Jersey $56,870
New Mexico $49,800
New York $60,500
North Carolina $48,880
North Dakota $57,610
Ohio $48,520
Oklahoma $49,280
Oregon $65,150
Pennsylvania $46,170
South Carolina $50,290
South Dakota $50,120
Tennessee $45,830
Texas $57,940
Utah $46,670
Virginia $45,530
Washington $49,440
West Virginia $59,440
Wisconsin $48,730
Wyoming $48,120

Tools & Technologies Used by Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers

Although they’re not necessarily needed for all jobs, the following technologies are used by many Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers:

  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Office
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Web browser software
  • Microsoft Access
  • Word processing software
  • Microsoft Windows
  • Adobe Systems Adobe Acrobat
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • Customer relationship management CRM software
  • Salesforce
  • Contact management software

How do I Become a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher?

What education or degrees do I need to become a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher?

undefined

How Long Does it Take to Become a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher?

undefined

Where Title Examiners, Abstractors, and Searchers Work

undefined

The table below shows some of the most common industries where those employed in this career field work.

undefined

Similar Careers

Those thinking about becoming a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher might also be interested in the following careers:

Career changers with experience as a Title Examiner, Abstractor, or Searcher sometimes find work in one of the following fields:

References:

Image Credit: Staff Sgt. Nicholas Rau via Public domain

More about our data sources and methodologies.

Featured Schools

Find Graduate Schools Near You

Our free school finder matches students with accredited graduate schools across the U.S.